February 20-24, 2019 Miami Beach
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Anderson Osorio

Head Chef Anderson Osorio

“I’ve worked in kitchens all my life,” says Osorio. He had restaurant jobs throughout high school in Peru, and when his family moved to Lenox, MA, he got a job as a dishwasher at the swanky Whitley Hotel. He was 18. And he was hooked. “I loved seeing the chefs cooking with such passion and detail,” Osorio says.

Osorio worked his way up the culinary ladder, gaining inspiration from renowned chefs including Nobu Matsuhisa, founder of New York’s renowned Nobu, Chef Makoto Okuwa. Along the way, he began to develop his... READ MORE

Head Chef Anderson Osorio

“I’ve worked in kitchens all my life,” says Osorio. He had restaurant jobs throughout high school in Peru, and when his family moved to Lenox, MA, he got a job as a dishwasher at the swanky Whitley Hotel. He was 18. And he was hooked. “I loved seeing the chefs cooking with such passion and detail,” Osorio says.

Osorio worked his way up the culinary ladder, gaining inspiration from renowned chefs including Nobu Matsuhisa, founder of New York’s renowned Nobu, Chef Makoto Okuwa. Along the way, he began to develop his own signature style, a unique fusion of traditional Peruvian cuisine and Asian cuisine. “Everything I cook contains at least one Peruvian ingredient,” he says.
He took over the kitchen at Miami’s 320 Gastro lounge in 2017. At that time, Osorio told Voyage MIA, “I decided to create dishes that allowed diners to experience my own personal stories, whether they are from what I’ve learned throughout my career or invoke a personal childhood memory from growing up in Peru.”

The dish that tells a powerful story for Osorio himself is Caldo de Gallina, a chicken soup from his youth “that makes me miss my country.” He cooks the dish at home, but not in his restaurant, because he is still chasing the perfect recipe. “I haven’t got it figured out yet,” he says. For special occasions, Osorio prepares a traditional Peruvian dish with potatoes and chicken, Carapulcra, which he also mostly makes just at home.

Osorio has a theory as to why Peruvian cuisine has become so popular recently. “It’s because of so many different ingredients. There are lots of flavors in the dishes.” And he doesn’t see its popularity waning anytime soon. “It [Peruvian Cuisine] will be everywhere, even in non-Peruvian restaurants. Peruvian ingredients can be used for any dish.” And where does chef Osorio like to dine when he’s in Peru? “That depends,” he says, “there are so many good chefs now. Of course, you can’t go wrong with Maido or Central.” Osorio recently left 320 Gastro lounge, and launched a Latin/Asian food truck in Miami. If you’re in the area, just look for a line of customers, because it’s a safe bet that it will be popular…and Peruvian.

Chef Anderson recently joined the newly opened Chotto Matte as a Head Chef, feels like a perfect match and he is eager to welcome Miami locals and visitors to a new culinary experience.

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