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Francis Mallmann 

FIRE – WOOD – ASH – PASSION 

Francis Mallmann was born in the city of Buenos Aires and when he was just nineteen, opened his first restaurant in Bariloche, where he began to gain loyal supporters. After a few years, during which time he had achieved great success, he jumped at the opportunity to open a restaurant in Uruguay, where his following continued to build. Francis was able to close his restaurants in the off season and travel to Europe, where he worked in world renowned kitchens in France under the direction of Alain Senderens, Roger Verge and Raymond Oliver. 

There he became the very first non-European Chef to win the Grand Prix de l’ Art de la Science de la Cuisine. His sensibility and free spirit made him a true innovator.  

After a while grew restless and bored by the fine dining scene. He decided to return to his roots: cooking with fire!—and applied French techniques to intensify, enhance and develop the flavors and textures of his dishes. He leads with simplicity, generally using only a few ingredients and a series of short steps for cooking. 

Francis Mallmann’s fame was forged by hard work and delicious food. He was trained in the kitchens of Europe, opened his own restaurants (and taught) in Argentina, starred in the gourmet television series called ‘Fires of the South’, and now offers his own insights into cooking with fire in a book ‘Seven Fires'(co-written by Peter Kaminsky).  

Much of Francis’s cooking defies precise scheduling, since fires and heating times vary so much depending on the place, the season, even the direction and force of the wind. But Francis does have one unshakable rule that defies the universal habit of constantly flipping food on the grill until it is done. “Once your ingredient comes in contact with the heat, don’t move it,” – “You must respect that first contact. Even if it’s not exactly in the right place, leave it alone. Otherwise, you will break the crisp surface that begins to form and dry out your food. ”